Teaching Argumentative Essay

2017 Student Editorial Contest, “In Nothing We Trust.”" class="css-11cwn6f" src="https://static01com/images/2016/11/08/opinion/08heath Web-LN-2/08heath Web-article Inline.jpg?

quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale" src Set="https://static01com/images/2016/11/08/opinion/08heath Web-LN-2/08heath Web-article Large.jpg? quality=90&auto=webp 600w,https://static01com/images/2016/11/08/opinion/08heath Web-LN-2/08heath Web-jumbo.jpg? quality=90&auto=webp 1024w,https://static01com/images/2016/11/08/opinion/08heath Web-LN-2/08heath Web-super Jumbo.jpg? quality=90&auto=webp 2048w" sizes="((min-width: 600px) and (max-width: 1004px)) 84vw, (min-width: 1005px) 60vw, 100vw" item Prop="url" item ID="https://static01com/images/2016/11/08/opinion/08heath Web-LN-2/08heath Web-article Inline.jpg? This post was originally written to accompany a webinar called Write to Change the World: Crafting Persuasive Pieces With Help from Nicholas Kristof and the Times Op-Ed Page, which you can watch on-demand anytime.

quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale"/How would your students describe the differences between the news sections of a newspaper and the opinion section? Bring in a few print copies of a newspaper, whether The Times or a local or school paper, and have your students work in small groups to contrast a news page with an opinion page and see what they discover. We’re interested in everything, if it’s opinionated and we believe our readers will find it worth reading.

Though this piece, “And Now a Word From Op-Ed,” is from 2004, it still provides a useful and quick overview of The Times’s Opinion section, even if the section then was mostly a print product. We are especially interested in finding points of view that are different from those expressed in Times editorials.

Last November, I had the great pleasure of presenting at the National Council of Teacher’s of English Annual Convention with author, educator, and our special guest Core Grammar blogger, Dr. Chin shared during her presentation should also be asked when writing argumentative essays.

Keeping in mind topic sentences and transitions, here are some key words that can help support students as they begin to write argumentatively.

The purpose of argumentative writing is to defend a position on a particular subject with the goal of persuading readers to accept or at least consider the argument.

There are four big ideas to remember when teaching argumentative writing: claim, reasons, evidence, and counterclaim. Chin included the following questions to focus topics in persuasive writing: The questions Dr.

3, 2017." class="css-1m50asq" src="https://static01com/images/2017/10/03/learning/Opinion LN/Opinion LN-article Inline.png?

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