Problem Solving Involving Linear Equation

If I have 6 tickets which cost each, the total cost is If I have 8 dimes, the total value is This is common sense, and is probably familiar to you from your experience with coins and buying things.But notice that these examples tell me what the general equation should be: The number of items times the cost (or value) per item gives the total cost (or value). The total value of the coins (880) is the value of the pennies will go in the third column.

The price of one stock is $35 per share, while the price of the other stock is $45 per share. How many shares of each stock did the investor buy?

Let x be the number of shares of the $35 stock and let y be the number of shares of the $45 stock.

But they are convenient for organizing information --- and they give you a pattern to get started with problems of a given kind (e.g.

interest problems, or time-speed-distance problems). In some cases, you the numbers in some of the columns in a table.

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If you are not a member or are having any other problems, please contact customer support.This is one reason why linear algebra (the study of linear systems and related concepts) is its own branch of mathematics.In your studies, however, you will generally be faced with much simpler problems. The ten's digit stands for "ten times of this digit's value".A total of 78 seats for a concert are sold, producing a total revenue of 3.If seats cost either .50 or .50, how many .50 seats and how many .50 seats were sold?Plugging the three points in the general equation for a quadratic, I get a system of three equations, where the variables stand for the unknown coefficients of that quadratic: ..other conics, though parabolas are the most common.Keep in mind that projectile problems (like shooting an arrow up in the air or dropping a penny from the roof of a tall building) are also parabola problems, using: if you're working in feet).The first and third columns give Multiply the first equation by 45, then subtract the second equation: Since , I have .The investor bought 120 shares of the stock and 240 shares of the stock. I'll let x be the number of 32-cent stamps, let y be the number of 29-cent stamps, and let z be the number of 3-cent stamps. The last column says The number of 29-cent stamps is 10 less than the number of 32-cent stamps, so The number of 3-cent stamps is 5 less than the number of 29-cent stamps, so I want to get everything in terms of one variable, so I have to pick a variable to use.Thus, 42 of the .50 seats and 36 of the .50 seats were sold. A total of 300 tickets are sold, and the total receipts were 40. The first and third columns give the equations Multiply the first equation by 15 and subtract equations: Then There were 120 tickets sold for each and 180 tickets sold for each.An investor buys a total of 360 shares of two stocks.

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