Gregory Crewdson Essay

Gregory Crewdson Essay-43
Gregory Crewdson was born in 1962 in Brooklyn, New York.He is a graduate of SUNY Purchase and the Yale University School of Art, where he is now director of graduate studies in photography. His work has been exhibited widely in the United States and Europe and is featured in many public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Brooklyn Museum; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC.

Gregory Crewdson was born in 1962 in Brooklyn, New York.He is a graduate of SUNY Purchase and the Yale University School of Art, where he is now director of graduate studies in photography. His work has been exhibited widely in the United States and Europe and is featured in many public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Brooklyn Museum; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC.

I feel like my pictures are about movies in as many ways as they’re not about movies.

When I make a picture I work very closely with Juliane Hiam, my partner, and we write descriptions for each picture, which is almost like a one-page screenplay.

“I was cross-country skiing in the middle of the woods in a pine forest and there was a little trail name called Cathedral of the Pines—and that spurred the entire project,” he said.

“It was a moment of revelation, where in my mind’s eye I somehow saw the whole body of work and knew I would be making this next body of work in Becket.

It’s a quality Crewdson believes may have been inspired by his father, a psychoanalyst who worked out of the family’s basement.

“This is basically what he did in his practice,” Crewdson told me.

Photographs are limited, they’re not like movies or literature because there’s no before or after.

But I’ve always seen that restriction as a positive, as a way of trying to create even more mystery.

What I find fascinating about your photos is that they create a psychological space that allows viewers to create their own narrative.

Two people can look at the same photo but tell themselves a completely different story.

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