Essay On What Feminist Theory Is

Essay On What Feminist Theory Is-71
These include first-hand accounts of women abducted during Partition in Bhasin and Menon’s as well as Urvashi Butalia’s essays, autobiographical narratives in Tanika Sarkar’s essay (1993), and literary texts in the works of Aamir Mufti (2000) and Partha Chatterjee (1993).It is through the Focusing on the ‘modes’ and the ‘means’ of representation (of the subaltern, or women in a postcolonial context) sheds light on one of the main issues raised by the collusion between the subaltern studies discourse (or, by extension, the postcolonial studies discourse) and feminist discourses: how do we the vengeful goddess)?

These include first-hand accounts of women abducted during Partition in Bhasin and Menon’s as well as Urvashi Butalia’s essays, autobiographical narratives in Tanika Sarkar’s essay (1993), and literary texts in the works of Aamir Mufti (2000) and Partha Chatterjee (1993).It is through the Focusing on the ‘modes’ and the ‘means’ of representation (of the subaltern, or women in a postcolonial context) sheds light on one of the main issues raised by the collusion between the subaltern studies discourse (or, by extension, the postcolonial studies discourse) and feminist discourses: how do we the vengeful goddess)?

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The publication project in French is thus accompanied, as Haase-Dubosc writes, by a concomitant publication in India of a volume on French feminism.

At the heart of Haase-Dubosc’s volume is the attempt to decolonize feminism, not only by examining the resemblance between the different movements and claims—whether French or Indian—but also, above all, by underlining the specificities (whether regional, historical, or cultural) that characterize these movements.

Whereas both are inextricably linked to the ‘postcolonial issue’ the relationships they maintain with it are distinct: if the issue of patriarchy understands ‘postcolonial’ in terms of domination versus submission, the issue of the representation of women understands postcolonialism through its as a culture of contacts and a relationship with diversity, in Homi Bhabha’s use of the term.7 Here is a crucial dimension: given that the genesis of postcolonial studies lies in the cultural field and that the first symptoms of the ‘postcolonial situation’ were located in literature, it is essential to identify the link between gender and postcolonialism in cultural expression, and not only in social or political expression.

(a key concept of the postcolonial discourse) of womanhood’s representations in postcolonial contexts and the diversity of these representations.

In other words, in this volume, heterogeneity prevails over any attempt to standardize women, oppression, and the modes of struggle. Hence, there is the need to cross and confront (ideas, perspectives, contexts), which aims not only at underlining the singularity of contexts (and thus of the emerging modes of women’s movements), but also, through the volume’s dialogic structure, at persuasively bypassing the pitfalls of universalism.

Stereotypes also need to be discussed as they echo France’s Orientalist past: it is essential, as Haase-Dubosc writes, to ‘radically break up with this situation The volume comprises thirty articles written by South Asian researchers or activists at the heart of contemporary debates, and bears witness to the diversity of its fields of investigation: history (Uma Chakravarti on gender comprehension in ancient India; Menon and Bhasin on women’s abduction during Partition); culture (Susie Tharu and K. Pushpamala on sculpture); social science (Annie Namal on Dalit women; Madhu Kiswar and Ruth Lalita on dowry); politics (Flavia Agnes on secular women’s movements, Nivedita Menon on quotas); health (Veena Shatrugna on women and mental health; Mira Sadgopal on fertility); and environment and development (Vandana Shiva on eco-feminism; Mary E. The volume thus underlines what Haase-Dubosc and Meenakshi Lal (2006) claimed a few years later in their gripping article ‘De la postcolonie et des femmes’: the urge to deconstruct the Orientalist image of the docile and silent Third-World Woman’ and revalorize the discourses of and on women, the specificity of non-Western feminist movements, and the promotion of history and culture in the approach of such movements.‘Decolonizing gender’, in Talpade Mohanty’s words, suggests accepting the diversity promoted by the author, but also implies ‘provincializing Europe’—bears witness to a growing interest in her work.Underlying this interest, however, is the sensitive issue of how France perceives its colonial past and its protective reflex towards contemporary feminist thought, the French roots of which are encroached on by gender studies.Van Woerkens’ new essay concerns another crucial issue both in the colonial and postcolonial discourse: women, their agency, and their empowerment in recent South Asian history.In many ways, Van Woerkens’ ambitious undertaking in The book is structured into three main parts, each concerned with exceptional female figures (the elite, the middle class, and plebs), with the goal of calling attention to the ‘silent revolution’ (Van Woerkens 2010: 31) initiated in high society.Far from essencializing women’s writings, this ‘écriture blanche’ in Hélène Cixous’ words (1975), Tharu and Lalita underline the specificities of both gender and historical experience: literary expression has to be read as both gendered and historicized, and as Lamenting the absence of a social history of Partition (at least in 1993, when the article was first published), the authors highlight a striking paradox: the marginalization of women in the history of Partition does not demonstrate their central role, both symbolic and concrete, during the violence of Partition, notably embodied by the massive scale of abductions and subsequent aggressive recovery campaigns undertaken both by India and Pakistan.Could the abducted or forcibly recovered woman—this ‘permanent refugee’ or ‘skeleton’ in Amrita Pritam’s words—become a metaphor for women’s condition where marginalization is the norm, where speaking is not authorized?In parallel, Julie Stephens unravels the ‘Feminist fictions’ (the ‘fictions of Otherness’ identified by Edward Said in Orientalist discourses) produced both by Western and Indian feminist anthropologists6 on the ‘Third-World Woman’ in a traditional context, which continue to see ‘her’ as a paragon of softness, passivity, and docility who submits to an immutable patriarchy.Stephens (1989: 110) also identifies a striking characteristic in this type of discourse: the ‘universalism’ of womanhood, which erases all cultural specificities.The omnipresence of women’s issues in South Asian political and historical discourses can nevertheless assume an attempt to This well-worn idea, generalized by Gayatri C.Spivak’s overly acclaimed article ‘Can the Subaltern Speak?

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